What Determines an Emerald’s Value?

Emeralds are considered one of the “big three” in precious gemstones, a classic jewel regularly used in high-end jewelry. But what differentiates one emerald from another? There are many factors that determine their value. If you’re in the market for emerald jewelry, here’s what you need to know about the most desirable qualities of this beautiful gemstone.

What Determines an Emerald's Value | Auction King

Clarity

Generally speaking, when you’re shopping for gemstones, the most valuable stones are those with no visible inclusions. However, that isn’t really the case for emeralds, because all natural emeralds have some inclusions that are visible to the naked eye or with a jeweler’s loupe. In fact, most emeralds receive some treatment to reduce the appearance of these inclusions during the lapidary process, which is not considered to affect the value of the stone. Only a synthetic emerald (much less valuable) might be perfectly clear—some are even given artificial inclusions to look more genuine. Thus, inclusions are a sign of an emerald’s authenticity. Emeralds that are considered “eye clear” are extremely rare, and quite valuable. It is only when inclusions are so numerous that they negatively affect the stone’s transparency that they can reduce an emerald’s value.

Color

An emerald’s brilliant green color is produced by trace amounts of chromium, vanadium, and iron. An individual stone can have a varying amount of each, and thus an emerald’s color can range from bluish green to yellow-green. The exact hue may hint at a stone’s origins—for example, emeralds from Zambia tend to be on the blue-green side, while emeralds from Brazil and Colombia are a more pure green. In general, the more intense the color, the more valuable the stone. Stones that are extremely light or extremely dark (so much so that the transparency is reduced) cost less per carat.

Cut

Emeralds are often cut in a rectangular shape, known as an emerald cut, to both enhance the natural color of the stone and to protect against chipping or breaking. Although they are resistant to scratches, emeralds tend to be somewhat brittle, and their natural inclusions can make them prone to fracturing. However, whatever the cut of the stone, it should enhance its natural sparkle and color.

Carats

While you can find emeralds in sizes ranging from truly tiny to huge, very fine grades of emeralds over one carat are rare. In general, a larger emerald will be worth more if its color and clarity are also good. If you have two stones with the same overall color and clarity, the larger one will be more valuable.

The overall value of an individual emerald is determined by a combination of these factors—a small but unusually clear emerald of gorgeous green may very well cost more than a much larger light-green emerald that looks cloudy from numerous inclusions. The best way to get a feel for the way these combinations can affect price is to shop around and compare prices.

Auction King regularly stocks emerald bracelets, necklaces, rings, and earrings in a variety of sizes, cuts, and styles. Our live online auction gives our buyers an opportunity to find exquisite pieces at below-market values. Sign up for a free online account today and browse our selections. The piece you’ve been looking for may be just a click away!

The Rarest Gemstone You’ve Never Heard of is About to Disappear

Tanzanite, the “gemstone of a generation,” will soon come to an end. Tanzanite mines are close to depletion.  This generation will most likely be the last one able to buy newly mined tanzanite.

The Rarest Gemstone You’ve Never Heard of is About to Disappear Auction King

 

In fact, as the gemstone becomes more scarce, the independent miners who once busily dug for tanzanite have started to give up on finding more of the rare stone. Many have drifted away to pursue other, more readily available gemstones elsewhere. In 2014, Richland Resources sold TanzaniteOne, the largest commercial tanzanite mining operation, to turn its attention to more profitable ventures. It is clear that they have seen the research: the remaining tanzanite supply is running dangerously low.

Investors have enjoyed the rising price of tanzanite in the past, which had previously grown at a rate of 400%. Now that the mines are emptying out, another spike in price is expected in the near future. Investors have said that the time to buy tanzanite is now. The current price of tanzanite generally falls between $550 and $700 per carat, and is expected to go up to $1,000 in a relatively short amount of time.

Though tanzanite is quite rare, it is a surprisingly new find. The gemstone was discovered in 1967 in the city of Mererani, Tanzania. Located in the foothills of Mt. Kilimanjaro, this small region is the only known source of tanzanite. The extremely tiny area where the gem has been mined is only one and a half square miles. Analysis of the composition and properties of tanzanite have led experts to conclude that the creation of this beautiful stone has not been replicated anywhere else on earth.

Tanzanite ranges in color from blue to violet, with the deepest color stones considered the most valuable. Due to its crystalline structure, it can appear to show different colors when it is viewed in different directions, displaying an array of blue and violet hues or even flashes of red when it is rocked back and forth. The supply of darker, more valuable stones is expected to be depleted long before mining ceases altogether, making these gemstones some of the rarest.

The effect of a dwindling supply of tanzanite on the market is already being felt. With demand rising above the availability of new, high-quality stones, prices have begun to rise. This trend of rising prices will only increase as extraction of any remaining stones in Tanzania becomes more difficult. While consumers in the past have enjoyed relatively low prices for beautiful specimens of tanzanite, it will soon be nearly impossible to find tanzanite of good quality at anything other than premium prices.

Opportunities to invest in tanzanite at attractive prices still exist. Hard to find in stores, many quality stones can be found at auctions. Those auctions specializing in seized assets and estate sales in particular, such as sites like AuctionKing.com, have high grade tanzanite.  Although tanzanite production is coming to a close, it isn’t too late to invest in one of these uniquely beautiful gems.

Rare Alexandrite for Auction: Unbelievable Sizes, Unbelievable Prices

A large collection of alexandrite, a rare and valuable color-changing gemstone, will soon be available to purchase at auction through AuctionKing.com. The collection, acquired by a Japanese billionaire, was entrusted to the popular site last month for sale due to Auction King’s expertise in fine jewelry and rare collectibles. Lab certification of the stones is now complete and the collection will be posted to the website for public view prior to auction.

Alexandrite, discovered in the Ural Mountains of Russia in 1830, is an extremely rare variety of chrysoberyl with unique color-changing properties. In daylight, alexandrite appears green, but in incandescent light, it is red. Stones can fall in a range from blue-green to yellow-green in daylight and orange-red to purple-red in artificial light. The dramatic color change of alexandrite when viewed in natural versus artificial light is caused by trace amounts of the element chromium in the crystal structure of the gemstone. In addition, alexandrite is pleochroic, meaning that it also exhibits different colors depending on which direction it is viewed from.

The gem was named after Alexander II, heir apparent to the Russian throne. Imperial Russian military colors were green and red, so alexandrite naturally became the national stone of czarist Russia. The original deposits of alexandrite in Russia have long since been depleted, but it can still be found in Sri Lanka, East Africa, and Brazil, albeit often at lower quality than that displayed in stones from the Urals. The unique chemical makeup and geological properties necessary to produce alexandrite mean it is rarer than diamonds, and the best gem-quality alexandrite remains a rare find to the present day.

The current auction of alexandrite represents an unparalleled opportunity for aficionados of fine and rare gemstones to buy high-quality stones. Alexandrite is most often seen in stones ranging from .5 to 2 karats. However, the collection of GIA-certified stones coming up for auction includes stones ranging to 30 karats and more. The average price for alexandrite is typically $5,000 per karat, with some high-quality stones going for as much as $50,000 per karat. At AuctionKing.com, opening bids start as low as $1, offering collectors the chance to purchase at below-market prices.

Collectors interested in purchasing from this one-of-a-kind collection of alexandrite can view available stones at www.AuctionKing.com. Auction King specializes in fine jewelry, luxury watches, fine art, and other high-end collectibles. Their online live auction format allows bidders from all over the world to take part, either by submitting an absentee bid prior to the start of an auction or by participating in real time. Customers may also request additional information on any item prior to the start of bidding.

Alexandrites enjoy a storied history and rare beauty that make them a valuable addition to the collection of any connoisseur of precious stones. The auction of this rare collection is expected to attract the interest of savvy buyers and dedicated collectors eager to take advantage of the opportunity to own an unbelievable stone at an unbelievable price.