Spotlight on August’s Birthstone: Peridot

Peridot’s rich history, along with its beautiful yellow-green brilliance, give it a deserved place of pride among gemstones. Its use as a gemstone dates back thousands of years. Ancient Egyptians, who called it “the gem of the sun,” mined it from the island of Zagarbad in the Mediterranean, one of the few known ancient sources of the gem. Many historians now believe that Cleopatra’s famed collection of emeralds was actually peridots. The stone was frequently mistaken for emeralds in medieval times, before more sophisticated gemological analysis was available.

Spotlight on August's Birthstone Peridot | Auction King

Fortunately for modern aficionados, many sources for peridot exist nowadays, including Arizona, New Mexico, Pakistan, Myanmar, Vietnam, and China. This gem-quality variety of the mineral olivine is found in igneous rocks and brought to the earth’s surface from deep in the mantle by volcanic activity. It ranges from a pale yellow-green to brownish-green, with a deep olive green considered the most desirable hue. Peridot has also been found in meteorites, although usually not in sizes large enough for use in jewelry.

The origin of the name “peridot” is unclear—while some say that it comes from the Arabic “faridat,” meaning “gem,” others speculate that it comes from the Greek “peridona,” meaning “giving plenty.” The stone has a wealth of meaning attributed to it. It has long been associated with healing properties, protection from evil spirits, abundance, and luck. On Hawaii, peridot is associated with Pele, the goddess of volcanoes.

It’s not hard to see why peridot has been a popular gemstone throughout the ages, nor why many cultures have attached meaning to it. The stone looks beautiful under both natural and artificial lighting, which has given it the nickname “the Evening Emerald.” Readily available, it’s an attractive option for those looking for beautiful green gemstone jewelry at an affordable price point. As with other transparent gemstones, its value increases with the size of the individual stone, lack of visible inclusions, and greater intensity of color. While peridot is often cut in standard faceted shapes from round and oval to marquise and triangle, it can also be made into beads and cabochons as well.

Peridot is a 6.5 to 7 on the Mohs scale of hardness, which means it is relatively resistant to scratching. However, the stone can be chipped by a careless blow, and is vulnerable to high heat or rapid temperature changes. You should not clean peridot with steam or with an ultrasonic cleaner.

Whether your birthday is in August or not, peridot makes a fine addition to anyone’s jewelry wardrobe. Auction King carries an assortment of peridot earrings, rings, necklaces, and bracelets, which we regularly update as new finds become available. Our live auctioneers are happy to answer your questions to help you find the exact piece for your taste, and you’ll find your budget goes further when you’re buying at below-market auction prices! Sign up for a free account today to get started.

How to Select Blue Topaz Stones

Blue topaz is one of the most popular colored gemstones on the market today. It’s no wonder—this stone combines beauty, durability, and affordability in one desirable package. If you’re interested in purchasing blue topaz, what should you be looking for?

How to Select Blue Topaz Stones | Auction King

The first thing to know is that topaz is an abundant mineral in nature, but most natural topaz is colorless (or nearly so). To produce a range of blue shades, topaz is generally treated with heat and/or radiation. This is a standard industry practice, and is considered permanent, though you should avoid exposing treated stones to extreme heat. Naturally occurring blue topaz is quite rare, and should you find one for sale, expect the price to reflect its scarcity.

Blue topaz has a Mohs scale hardness of 8, which makes it resistant to scratching and thus suitable for all kinds of jewelry. However, like diamond, topaz exhibits perfect cleavage, so the mineral can be prone to chipping. You may want to consider a bezel setting for blue topaz pieces that would see hard wear, such as rings worn on a daily basis, to avoid damage. It has a high refractive index, which gives it a brilliant sparkle.

Blue topaz stones should be evaluated on the basis of their clarity, color, cut, and carats. Stones should be transparent and free of any visible inclusions, which would reduce the value of the stone significantly. Blue topaz is available in a range of hues, so judging the color is somewhat subjective, although as a rule darker, more saturated colors tend to be more valuable. If you are purchasing a necklace, earrings, or bracelet, you’ll want to be sure that the color of all the stones is well matched.

Blue topaz is available in a full range of standard cuts. Oval, pear, and emerald cuts are all popular, as they tend to take advantage of topaz’s natural crystal shape and to maximize the depth of color. Whatever the cut, it should enhance both the hue and the light-reflecting properties of the stone. You should never purchase a blue topaz that looks dull.

In smaller sizes, blue topaz is fairly inexpensive, but the price rises as the size of the stone increases. However, relative to other blue gemstones such as sapphire and aquamarine, blue topaz is still reasonably affordable in larger sizes.

Auction King regularly features blue topaz pendants, rings, and more in our auction. Feel free to browse our selection and ask us anything you’d like to know about any of the pieces on offer—we pride ourselves not only on our convenient-to-use bidding platform and great deals, but also on our commitment to friendly, responsive customer service. Register for a free online account to start bidding today!