Tanzanite Jewelry Designs

From its popularity, you might not realize that tanzanite is a relatively recent discovery among gemstones. The blue-violet gem was first discovered in 1967 in Tanzania, for which it is named, and is found in only one small area in the foothills of Mt. Kilimanjaro. Tanzanite is known both for its deep, gorgeous color and its trichroism—when tilted in different directions, the stone gives flashes of blue, violet, or burgundy. Its beauty has made tanzanite a natural choice for fine jewelry, and you will readily find it in necklaces, earrings, bracelets, and rings.

Tanzanite Jewelry Designs | Auction King

Tanzanite is most often set in gold (white or yellow) or platinum. Silver is not recommended for setting tanzanite because the metal lacks the strength to properly protect the stone. Tanzanite has a hardness of 6.5 on the Mohs scale, which makes it somewhat vulnerable to scratching, and it has one direction of perfect cleavage, which could result in chipping should the stone be struck sharply. Because of this, jewelers suggest that tanzanite rings not be worn for daily wear, unless the setting is designed to protect the stone, such as in a bezel setting.

Tanzanite can be found in almost any shape you desire, although cushion and oval cuts are very popular, as they show off the stone’s color well. The rough stone itself can dictate the shape of the final cut, as jewelers seek to craft the largest and most beautiful finished gem possible from the raw material. The most saturated and desirable color will be found, naturally, in the largest stones. Most cut tanzanite stones are relatively small, and their value increases dramatically as their size increases.

Tanzanite is frequently surrounded in diamonds or set with diamond accents, as the cool brilliance of diamonds contrasts dramatically with tanzanite’s velvety blue. For the same reason, white gold and platinum are popular choices for settings. The stone appears in all kinds of settings, though, from sleek and modern to ornate, so the main factor in dictating your choice should be your personal preference. Because tanzanite can vary in color, you’ll want to take care in matching pieces you intend to wear together, such as earrings and a necklace.

Tanzanite jewelry is best cleaned with mild soap and warm water, and then dried with a soft cloth. Ultrasonic cleaning and steam cleaning is not recommended, and you should avoid exposing tanzanite to high temperatures, sudden temperature changes, or strong acids. However, with a little care, your tanzanite jewelry can be a joy to you and an heirloom to pass down.

If you’re looking for a special tanzanite piece, you can find necklaces, pendants, bracelets, earrings, and rings at AuctionKing.com. We constantly seek out the highest quality jewelry and regularly update our inventory with new finds. Our live online auctions bring these treasures to you at below-market prices every day.

The Rarest Gemstone You’ve Never Heard of is About to Disappear

Tanzanite, the “gemstone of a generation,” will soon come to an end. Tanzanite mines are close to depletion.  This generation will most likely be the last one able to buy newly mined tanzanite.

The Rarest Gemstone You’ve Never Heard of is About to Disappear Auction King

 

In fact, as the gemstone becomes more scarce, the independent miners who once busily dug for tanzanite have started to give up on finding more of the rare stone. Many have drifted away to pursue other, more readily available gemstones elsewhere. In 2014, Richland Resources sold TanzaniteOne, the largest commercial tanzanite mining operation, to turn its attention to more profitable ventures. It is clear that they have seen the research: the remaining tanzanite supply is running dangerously low.

Investors have enjoyed the rising price of tanzanite in the past, which had previously grown at a rate of 400%. Now that the mines are emptying out, another spike in price is expected in the near future. Investors have said that the time to buy tanzanite is now. The current price of tanzanite generally falls between $550 and $700 per carat, and is expected to go up to $1,000 in a relatively short amount of time.

Though tanzanite is quite rare, it is a surprisingly new find. The gemstone was discovered in 1967 in the city of Mererani, Tanzania. Located in the foothills of Mt. Kilimanjaro, this small region is the only known source of tanzanite. The extremely tiny area where the gem has been mined is only one and a half square miles. Analysis of the composition and properties of tanzanite have led experts to conclude that the creation of this beautiful stone has not been replicated anywhere else on earth.

Tanzanite ranges in color from blue to violet, with the deepest color stones considered the most valuable. Due to its crystalline structure, it can appear to show different colors when it is viewed in different directions, displaying an array of blue and violet hues or even flashes of red when it is rocked back and forth. The supply of darker, more valuable stones is expected to be depleted long before mining ceases altogether, making these gemstones some of the rarest.

The effect of a dwindling supply of tanzanite on the market is already being felt. With demand rising above the availability of new, high-quality stones, prices have begun to rise. This trend of rising prices will only increase as extraction of any remaining stones in Tanzania becomes more difficult. While consumers in the past have enjoyed relatively low prices for beautiful specimens of tanzanite, it will soon be nearly impossible to find tanzanite of good quality at anything other than premium prices.

Opportunities to invest in tanzanite at attractive prices still exist. Hard to find in stores, many quality stones can be found at auctions. Those auctions specializing in seized assets and estate sales in particular, such as sites like AuctionKing.com, have high grade tanzanite.  Although tanzanite production is coming to a close, it isn’t too late to invest in one of these uniquely beautiful gems.